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"This visualization was created using simulations run on the supercomputers at the National Center of Computational Sciences and shows the expected operation of the ITER fusion reactor. This reactor is currently being built by a global coalition in Cadarache, France and is expected to begin the first experiments in 2020. To produce fusion reactions, the fuel must be heated to a temperature of over one hundred and fifty million degrees -- more than ten times the temperature of the sun's core. An initial plasma is formed and heated by driving an electric current through the fuel gas in the tokamak chamber. When the plasma reaches a sufficient density and temperature, the injectors are turned on. These very energetic beam ions are trapped by the magnetic field and circulate throughout the plasma, colliding with the plasma particles and transferring energy to them. As the temperature of the plasma rises, reactions between the plasma deuterium and tritium begin to occur." Jamison Daniel.
Images associated with DIII-D located at General Atomics (GA).



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Images associated with Alcator C-Mod located in the Plasma Science and Fusion Center (PSFC) at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT).


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Images associated with the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) located at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL).


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This 2008 video takes you inside the DIII D tokamak at General Atomics Lab in San Diego, California. Normally the plasma inside this vessel is at a temperature greater then the core of the Sun. This video focuses on introducing some of the technology involved in fusion energy research.
"ITER (originally the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor) is the international research and engineering project which is currently building the world's largest and most advanced experimental tokamak nuclear fusion reactor and will be constructed in Europe, at Cadarache in the south of France. The ITER tokamak aims to make the long awaited transition from today's studies of plasma physics to full scale electricity-producing fusion power plants. The project's members are the European Union, Japan, China, the United States, South Korea, India and Russia. The fusion reactor itself has been designed to produce 500 MW of output power for 50 MW of input power, or ten times the amount of energy put in." Marius L
These are images of tokamaks and other devices, plasmas, and illustrations that are associated with fusion or burning plasma research.


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NOTE: This presentation has no audio track. "Within the tokamak, we see field coils, the vacuum vessel, blanket modules, divertor cassettes, and equipment for heating and diagnostics. Visible is one of the high-energy neutral beam injectors that heat and drive the plasma. The fusion fuel consists of deuterium and tritium, which are isotopes of ordinary hydrogen (shown in red and green in the visualization). To produce fusion reactions, the fuel must be heated to a temperature of about one hundred million degrees - about ten times the temperature of the core of the sun. At such temperatures, the electrons of atoms are stripped from the nuclei forming as a state of matter called plasma. One method of achieving these high temperatures is by injecting beams of high-energy neutral atoms into the tokamak. An initial plasma is formed and heated by driving an electric current through the fuel gas in the tokamak chamber. When the plasma reaches a sufficient density and temperature, the injectors are turned on. Because injected atoms are electrically neutral, they are unaffected by the magnetic field and can penetrate deep into the plasma before being ionized by collisions with plasma particles. These very energetic beam ions are trapped by the magnetic field and circulate throughout the plasma, colliding with the plasma particles and transferring energy to them. As the temperature of the plasma rises, due to the beam heating, fusion reactions between the plasma deuterium and tritium begin to occur." Jamison Daniel
"Physicist Steven Cowley is certain that nuclear fusion is the only truly sustainable solution to the fuel crisis. He explains why fusion will work -- and details the projects that he and many others have devoted their lives to, working against the clock to create a new source of energy." TEDtalksDirector
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